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Flameshadow117
Emily
Artist | Hobbyist | Digital Art
United States

DB3 - Fav without Worry by SparkLum
...but I do LOVE comments! :D
Commissions - Ask Me by SweetDukeCollaborations - Ask Me by SweetDuke

John Linnell Stamp by tehmandyTMBG Presidents Stamp by KnaarenGrima+Eowyn Stamp by Flameshadow117
The Lion King 1 by princess-femi-stamps Nature by fear-the-brillianceLon Suder by Flameshadow117
Marvin Stamp by Maria87 The Guide Stamp by bandit4edu Mal Quote Firefly stamp by arsh-stamps
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Window of Opportunity by LeonaWindrider Three Fries Short by LeonaWindrider Al Calavicci by LeonaWindrider
God does NOT exist by Lizzie-Doodle Tim Minchin Stamp by mrTwisby Tom Lehrer Stamp by RipfangDragon
I support Richard Dawkins by PaleoClipperArtStamp: One Way Speech by 8manderz8
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Another BSL stamp by ILTBY Deed Not Breed by CanisEnthusiast Furry stamp by golden-jackal
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Chain letter stamp by Hapuriainen 90'S BABIES ARE THE BEEEEEST by endlerOff with the Nostalgia Glasses! by endler
The Truth has a Liberal Bias. by MartianMeerkat

Mature Content

Legalize Prostitution by ConsiderablyDin
Mary Sue Safe Zone by MissLunaRose
Don't be a dick about the things you don't like by YellowfangOfStarclan Sex Positive with Laci Green by Flameshadow117Sin is so delicious by Lizzie-Doodle
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I hate punitive justice.

That type of justice that says people ought to be punished, and locks them up in jail for years where they can be emotionally and physically abused by fellow inmates, guards, and by the sheer isolation and confinement.

I know why people love punitive justice, too.

People are animals, all of us. When someone hurts us, we want to hurt them back. We want revenge. Revenge makes us feel like we're in control. When someone makes us feel powerless, it feels like the only way to take our power back is by making that person pay -- making them powerless.

Even if we haven't been hurt directly, when someone enters that realm of "criminal," "bad-guy," "villain," then we all want to see them suffer. Just look at all the people, who have probably never been sexually abused, sneering and joking about how they can't wait for Jared Fogel to get raped in prison. Look at the people who weren't even alive for WWII, thrilled to see 90-year old former Nazis being found and jailed.

This response is natural, and human. We are social creatures, and we long to protect each other. When someone rapes a child, or is involved in terror and genocide, we all take it personally. We want to stop them, and protect the victims. Some would say people who have crossed that line don't deserve to live, or be part of society anymore.

That's one way to look at it -- the cold, fierce, human way.

The way we respond to violent offenders, ironically, is a reflection of that violence within ourselves. When we gain joy in the suffering of the criminal, we are reveling in the same cruelty the criminal held in his heart when he committed the crime.

Moreover, it doesn't solve anything.

We're so obsessed with who "deserves" to be punished, we don't consider the outcomes. Put a rapist in jail for ten years. Callously rejoice as he is sexually abused by his cell mate. Set him free on the world again. What do you have now, but a more violent man than you put in?

I'm not saying that we shouldn't jail rapists, of course. In fact, anybody who presents a danger to society ought to be jailed. Prison makes a lot of sense when it is used to keep criminals from hurting anybody else.

But consider the case of Cornealious Michael "Mike" Anderson III. He committed an armed robbery in 2000, and was sentenced to 13 years in prison. Due to a hilariously bureaucratic clerical error, the prison wouldn't let him check in for his sentence, because the computers said he was already checked in. He waited for it to be sorted out, but nothing happened.

He went on with his life.

He met his wife, got married, and founded a company in the intervening years. The prison only noticed that he wasn't there the year he was scheduled for release.

Imagine if he'd gone to jail, instead of being allowed to "get away with his crime." Imagine he'd gotten the punishment he "deserved." Decent chance he'd be involved in a gang, have new scars, and far from owning his own company, he would find himself unemployable due to his criminal record. He might be so broke, he'd consider turning to robbery again.

Is that really better?

Nope. It's clear in this case that punitive justice would have only served to cause more harm to society.

But we want so badly to see people punished.

It's so easy to dehumanize people. Violent offenders dehumanize their victims in order to exploit them, but then in turn, we dehumanize the offenders. Yet we don't see the irony there.

We don't see that the capacity for cruelty and lust for blood is within every single one of us. We "law abiding citizens" merely get our fix of schadenfreude by watching criminals suffer.

So, what would I propose, then? How should criminal justice be dealt with?

Fuck, I don't know.

There are people out there who are dangerous, and abusive, and who can't be rehabilitated or changed. They are so fundamentally warped, there is no re-integrating them. They need to be put away where they can't hurt innocent people. Perhaps, yes, even executed.

Then there are those who made a mistake, who got swept up in something, who were indoctrinated in a toxic culture or attitude, who were desperate and saw no other choice, or who were just so hopeless and alone.

Those people deserve a chance.

The only problem is, how do you tell the difference? Can you discern between a genuinely repentant heart, and one that is lying through its teeth? Mistaking a reformed rapist who has rejected their toxic entitlement and is crushed by their own guilt with one who will do it all over again and hide the evidence is a life-destroying error for the next victim.

Hence: fuck. I don't know. But I think the first step is just to try.

Anyone who can be rehabilitated ought to be. That should be our first priority: how to get offenders to the point where they can be productive, safe members of society. That doesn't involve emotional or physical cruelty, but training, therapy, and support. If they harmed society, then the consequence should be for them to give back, and help heal the damage they caused.

That would actually lead to a positive outcome, as opposed to the old "eye for an eye" justice that leaves everyone scarred.

If someone is non-violent, if they no longer pose any threat, then what is the point of imprisoning them? I hear reasons like, "there need to be consequences," and "they can't just get away with it," or, "to make an example."

Fuck that. Why must there be consequences, if all those consequences mean is more damage?

Punishment makes us feel like we have power, or control. It makes us feel good about ourselves, but often it serves no purpose whatsoever. It's simply revenge. And I staunchly do not believe in that.

The only way to fight cruelty, violence, and dehumanization is to root it out wherever it exists -- not just in "them," but within ourselves. That includes removing punishment for punishment's sake from our notion of justice.
When you're young, you start off believe that you are you, because you are. You believe in a "soul."

In a fundamental, immutable essence of you-ness.

If someone does evil, it is because they are evil.

You are incapable of evil, because you are good.

Isn't that right?

But it's not.

Every one of us could be a serial killer, a rapist, an abuser, a thief. It's within us, as human beings. We only avoid it because we're lucky.

"You" start off with your parents. You inherit their DNA, which predisposes you toward certain personality types, intelligence level, physicality, mental illness. If you had anxious parents, you will likely be anxious. If you had ADD parents, you will likely get ADD. How much testosterone do you have? How naturally aggressive are you? How able is your mind to cope with stressors?

These are all determined before you are even born.

It could have happened to any one of us. I could have been born a pedophile, or a psychopath, or schizophrenic and it would be entirely beyond my choosing. There is no free will there.

Any human being could be born that way.

Then these people raise you-- or someone raises you. Were you loved, and taught kindness and empathy? Were you coddled too much, and given everything you ever asked for, until you expected life handed to you on a silver platter? Was softness beaten out of you, as your father told you crying was weakness, and hit you again? Did your mother tell you that you were worthless and disgusting?

Did they love you?

Did they teach you bigotry?

Did you learn bigotry, because you needed something to make your life make sense?

Did you learn empathy, because no one should suffer like you did?

Did they send you to school, make you worldly, build your confidence, and tell you that anything you dream of can be yours with hard work?

How you get raised is also not a choice, is it?

There is no free will about it.

You can choose what it shapes you into, to some extent, but it's likely your reaction are also predetermined by your genetics, and epigenetics.

Were you rich, or poor?

Were you raised in violence, or peace?

What were the cultural values you were steeped in?

These are what shape you. To hell with an immutable "soul."

And it can all be taken away or changed as quickly as reprogramming a computer. Brainwashing and Pavlovian conditioning can make major changes. Brain trauma can cause permanent changes in the fundamental nature of "you."

I suppose the point is, before you judge someone from a position of superiority-- before you dismiss someone as "evil," and so "unlike you," remember: it could have been you.

It just as easily could have been you.
you know what my problem is? I have no drive to improve myself.

A normal person, I suspect, notices they aren't doing well at a thing. They're failing expectations. So they strive to do better. They determine to improve, or to try something they're better at.

I don't ever feel determined to improve. I feel like nothing I ever do could possibly make things better. So instead of bucking up and trying harder, I just want to die.

That's the best solution I can come up with.

The best advice I have for myself is, "You're failing because you're horrible, and worthless, and any time you think you're good at something you're only going to find out everyone else thinks you suck," and the best response I have is, "I should hurt myself. I should die."

Is that normal?

It doesn't feel normal.

Went to a psychiatrist the other day, btw, about my suspected ADD that makes it impossible for me to write my own stories, do blogging for work, or even sit through movies that I like. I was terrified that they'd send me away because I don't have any "real problems." I cried alot when I made the appointment, because I was afraid they'll call me a faker.

Well, he basically did.

I talked to the psychiatrist for less than an hour, and told him how I can't focus. It always feels like I've just barely forgotten something. He also asked me about some other stuff, like if I ever think about hurting myself. I told him I did, and he didn't ask for any elaboration.

Then he said I don't have ADD because I am able to focus on some things, like things I find interesting. He thinks I have "claustrophobia" where I try to mentally escape in situations where I feel trapped, by doodling or daydreaming or checking Facebook. He said ADD gets over-diagnosed.

My boyfriend, who was diagnosed with ADD, thinks the doctor is full of shit and was being contrarian because he thinks ADD gets over-diagnosed.

I don't know. Could be either, I guess. I sure would've liked those focus-drugs, though.

Anyway, I've been extra depressed since then and my work has dropped even further.

Well... "depressed." I don't think I have depression any more than I have ADD, though I sometimes wonder if frequently wanting to kill yourself counts as "depression." I feel like there are other symptoms than that. I think I just decided my own death is a logical and acceptable solution.

After all, everyone dies. Then you go back to being part of the universe. That's nice.

So yeah, I cried alot, because apparently I don't have a neurological condition that makes me unable to focus... just a psychological one. He recommended talk therapy, which I think is bullshit. Various sources will tell you it doesn't work... though others say it does. I don't see as how talking about it is going to really help me. Feels like a scam, TBH.

Anyway, since learning I don't get to just take magical drugs to make me improve at work, I'm back to feeling like the world's biggest piece of shit. I'm just lazy, really. I'm just distractable, and forgetful, and probably just not trying hard enough.

I guess I don't really want to die, but I just don't see any hope of improving. I've never had a job I'm good at, ever. This one pays almost twice what I've ever been paid before, and I'm going to get fired from it, and I'll never have a job this good ever again.

The fuck am I gonna do?

And again, my only answer: lay in a hole and die. Just... die. Please.
Sexy Chucky Cosplay by Flameshadow117
Sexy Chucky Cosplay
"Sexy" Cosplay of Chucky from Child's Play (specifically, makeup & Heart of Damballa prop are from Bride of Chucky). 

Leggings were custom-made and available at my Society6 shop

Model, makeup: me
Costume: Store-bought "Sexy Chucky" costume, custom leggings, Converse, Friday the 13th (lol) replica knife, Heart of Damballa replica. 

Yes, I cut and dyed my hair for this. :la:
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Martin doodle by Flameshadow117
Martin doodle
More Martin Klamski! Because I cannot get enough of Brad Dourif in Istanbul ;) 
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I hate punitive justice.

That type of justice that says people ought to be punished, and locks them up in jail for years where they can be emotionally and physically abused by fellow inmates, guards, and by the sheer isolation and confinement.

I know why people love punitive justice, too.

People are animals, all of us. When someone hurts us, we want to hurt them back. We want revenge. Revenge makes us feel like we're in control. When someone makes us feel powerless, it feels like the only way to take our power back is by making that person pay -- making them powerless.

Even if we haven't been hurt directly, when someone enters that realm of "criminal," "bad-guy," "villain," then we all want to see them suffer. Just look at all the people, who have probably never been sexually abused, sneering and joking about how they can't wait for Jared Fogel to get raped in prison. Look at the people who weren't even alive for WWII, thrilled to see 90-year old former Nazis being found and jailed.

This response is natural, and human. We are social creatures, and we long to protect each other. When someone rapes a child, or is involved in terror and genocide, we all take it personally. We want to stop them, and protect the victims. Some would say people who have crossed that line don't deserve to live, or be part of society anymore.

That's one way to look at it -- the cold, fierce, human way.

The way we respond to violent offenders, ironically, is a reflection of that violence within ourselves. When we gain joy in the suffering of the criminal, we are reveling in the same cruelty the criminal held in his heart when he committed the crime.

Moreover, it doesn't solve anything.

We're so obsessed with who "deserves" to be punished, we don't consider the outcomes. Put a rapist in jail for ten years. Callously rejoice as he is sexually abused by his cell mate. Set him free on the world again. What do you have now, but a more violent man than you put in?

I'm not saying that we shouldn't jail rapists, of course. In fact, anybody who presents a danger to society ought to be jailed. Prison makes a lot of sense when it is used to keep criminals from hurting anybody else.

But consider the case of Cornealious Michael "Mike" Anderson III. He committed an armed robbery in 2000, and was sentenced to 13 years in prison. Due to a hilariously bureaucratic clerical error, the prison wouldn't let him check in for his sentence, because the computers said he was already checked in. He waited for it to be sorted out, but nothing happened.

He went on with his life.

He met his wife, got married, and founded a company in the intervening years. The prison only noticed that he wasn't there the year he was scheduled for release.

Imagine if he'd gone to jail, instead of being allowed to "get away with his crime." Imagine he'd gotten the punishment he "deserved." Decent chance he'd be involved in a gang, have new scars, and far from owning his own company, he would find himself unemployable due to his criminal record. He might be so broke, he'd consider turning to robbery again.

Is that really better?

Nope. It's clear in this case that punitive justice would have only served to cause more harm to society.

But we want so badly to see people punished.

It's so easy to dehumanize people. Violent offenders dehumanize their victims in order to exploit them, but then in turn, we dehumanize the offenders. Yet we don't see the irony there.

We don't see that the capacity for cruelty and lust for blood is within every single one of us. We "law abiding citizens" merely get our fix of schadenfreude by watching criminals suffer.

So, what would I propose, then? How should criminal justice be dealt with?

Fuck, I don't know.

There are people out there who are dangerous, and abusive, and who can't be rehabilitated or changed. They are so fundamentally warped, there is no re-integrating them. They need to be put away where they can't hurt innocent people. Perhaps, yes, even executed.

Then there are those who made a mistake, who got swept up in something, who were indoctrinated in a toxic culture or attitude, who were desperate and saw no other choice, or who were just so hopeless and alone.

Those people deserve a chance.

The only problem is, how do you tell the difference? Can you discern between a genuinely repentant heart, and one that is lying through its teeth? Mistaking a reformed rapist who has rejected their toxic entitlement and is crushed by their own guilt with one who will do it all over again and hide the evidence is a life-destroying error for the next victim.

Hence: fuck. I don't know. But I think the first step is just to try.

Anyone who can be rehabilitated ought to be. That should be our first priority: how to get offenders to the point where they can be productive, safe members of society. That doesn't involve emotional or physical cruelty, but training, therapy, and support. If they harmed society, then the consequence should be for them to give back, and help heal the damage they caused.

That would actually lead to a positive outcome, as opposed to the old "eye for an eye" justice that leaves everyone scarred.

If someone is non-violent, if they no longer pose any threat, then what is the point of imprisoning them? I hear reasons like, "there need to be consequences," and "they can't just get away with it," or, "to make an example."

Fuck that. Why must there be consequences, if all those consequences mean is more damage?

Punishment makes us feel like we have power, or control. It makes us feel good about ourselves, but often it serves no purpose whatsoever. It's simply revenge. And I staunchly do not believe in that.

The only way to fight cruelty, violence, and dehumanization is to root it out wherever it exists -- not just in "them," but within ourselves. That includes removing punishment for punishment's sake from our notion of justice.

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:iconbadcowboy69:
BadCowboy69 Featured By Owner 3 days ago  Hobbyist General Artist
Miss you...hope you are doing ok.
Reply
:iconflameshadow117:
Flameshadow117 Featured By Owner 1 day ago  Hobbyist Digital Artist
ahhh hi! Thank you! I am doing pretty alright! Just not been on DeviantART at all latety ^^; 
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:iconbadcowboy69:
BadCowboy69 Featured By Owner 1 day ago  Hobbyist General Artist
Well, glad to hear from you :)   
Reply
:iconchid0:
chid0 Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2016  Hobbyist
I've come across this beautiful sculpture and immediately thought you might like it too: www.blackshore.se/3d/demoreel-…
Reply
:iconflameshadow117:
Flameshadow117 Featured By Owner 1 day ago  Hobbyist Digital Artist
:drool: OH. MY. GAWD. 
Reply
:iconyimba:
Yimba Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2016
Happy Birthday <X3 Meow :3 Hug birthday cake Birthday Sis :happy birthday: Birthday cupcake 
Reply
:iconjamesthunder:
JamesThunder Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2016  Student Artist
Howdy, Emily! Ah' just came here to wish ya a Happy Birthday!! :D :hug: :party: :cake: :party:
Reply
:icondestiny3000:
Destiny3000 Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2016  Hobbyist Writer
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

Hope you have a great day!
Reply
:icondestiny3000:
Destiny3000 Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
What an incredible gallery you have!
Reply
:iconflameshadow117:
Flameshadow117 Featured By Owner 1 day ago  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you :)
Reply
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